Tag Archives: sugarfree

Sprouted Seed and Vegetable Bread

Having leftovers is essential in our house! If the fridge isn’t open then there is someone at the table eating.

My daughter loves her ‘froggy bread’ with Avocado or Tahini or Beetroot smeared all over in the morning. We have made this recipe from Pete Evan’s Cook Book and include different ingredients each time. I often add the quinoa if I am not going to eat it as I still have issues with grain. This week I had zoodles and spaghetti pumpkin coming out my ears (I still do) so I decided to jazz up the sprouted bread recipe to see what would happen, it’s denser and it took the full 2 and 1/2 hours to cook but it is yum and I haven’t had any complaints yet.

Sprouted Seed and Vegetable Bread

PREPARATION              TOTAL TIME
1 DAY                    1 DAY 3 HOURS

INGREDIENTS
Pre-heat oven to 180c

360g Buckwheat kernels
180g flax, pumpkin, sunflower seed mix
70g Chia seeds
1 tsp Himalayan Salt
1 tbsp. Turmeric (use any herb or spice you like. We have sumac, za’tar, cumin, oregano, basil breads)
1 tbsp. Slippery Elm Powder
1 tsp Spirulina
1/2 Cup Raw Zoodles
1/2 Cup cooked Spaghetti Pumpkin (or any pumpkin or sweet potato)
250 ml Filtered Water
INSTRUCTIONS

1. Soak Buckwheat Kernels in a bowl. In a separate bowl soak Pumpkin Seeds, Sunflower Seeds, and Flax over night in water. Drain and rinse the next morning.

2. In the food processor add 250ml water and chia seeds. Pulse for 30 seconds on and off

3. Add spices, supplements/superfoods and salt and pulse

4. Add Buckwheat and Seeds and pulse on and off for a few minutes until it is combined.

5. Add vegetables and pulse

6. I had to add more water at this point. I didn’t measure but I made sure that it was a thick goopy consistency. Keep adding and pulsing until you have the right sloppiness.

7. Line a bread loaf tin with baking paper and pour mixture in

8. Bake for 2.5 hours. Checking the centre is vital as the outside will crisp up and the inside will still be undercooked. When the skewer is clean you’re done.

9. Leave to cool in tin for 30 minutes before slicing.

This loaf keeps in fridge for 5 days.
Coat in egg and fry for french toast, toast with breakfast, toast and use as bread crumbs, serve with soups, slow cooker recipes.
Have with nut and seed butters. The list could go on. Check below with how you can join the realfoodmum community

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Fermentation Debate

I always over promise things but to be honest I lost the research and citation I had on the topic of wild vs cultured fermentation and it has taken me a while to find where I was at the time and what I wanted to get across.

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Sarah Craven Photography

Do you ferment vegetables? Drinks?
Have you heard people talk about Kimchi, Water Kefir, Milk Kefir, Kombucha, Whey, Kvass? Are you wondering what all the craze is and why people are using these words and swapping grains and SCOBY’s?

It’s called Lacto-Fermentation:
Lactic acid is a natural preservative it inhibits the growth of harmful,  bacteria. Fermentation has travelled through cultures for years as it allowed people to preserve foods for extended periods of time before the advent of refrigeration or canning.
Lactic acid also promotes the growth of healthy bacteria in the intestinal tract. That is why lacto-fermented foods are considered probiotic foods. (Probiotic means “for life”.)

The process and science behind lacto-fermentation is amazing and it is where it first had me hooked (inner geek).  You see lactobacillus (from a prepared culture, fresh whey, or just naturally occurring) plus sugar (naturally present in vegetables and fruits), plus a little salt, minus oxygen (anaerobic process), plus time, equal lactic acid fermentation. How cool? How complex? Let’s cut to the chase.

Why have people started on the fermented foods?

Nearly every person I meet has a topical, digestive issue. Thyroid’s are very popular, candida’s population could inhabit 10 of our worlds plus venus, mars and pluto….get my drift?! Doctors have been prescribing antibiotics, cortisone creams for as long as I can remember. Now remember that I speak from personal experience only, I love doctors, nurses, the medical profession is needed but for me I abused it and it’s resources. Most people who I suggest lacto-fermentation to have one or more of the following;

  • Signs of intestinal or systemic Candida overgrowth
  • An immune system that has lost its balance—with signs of allergies or autoimmune disease
  • An inflamed and leaky gut
  • Bacterial overgrowth
  • Multiple food sensitivities
  • Mood or behavioural disorders
  • Skin rashes, eczema, or acne
  • Antibiotic overuse

But with everything in life there are road blocks, there are caution signs. Lacto-fermented foods are kind of like a really good block of chocolate. You eat a small piece you feel great, you eat the whole block you feel like a warrior for 3 minutes then curl in a ball and cry wondering why you went so far and delving into the seven deadly sins over the following 48 hours.

So it brings me to how much and when?!

For a regular person that presents with no real issues and wants to boost their immune system and jump on the ferment train (wooo wooo) then I say for WILD! Wild fermentation is wonderful. Using whey, kefir grains, kombucha scoby’s, salt only is a special process. We reproduce all our Wild cultures and love how we can share our ‘babies’ around. So check my recipes and make some. Find a person locally that can supply you with a SCOBY and grains or contact me personally.

Now for the rest of us WILD can be more bad than good. I started the lacto-fermentation process in a WILD way and I went backwards quickly. What I thought was going to be the answer to my prayers was a nightmare. You see, people with damaged ecosystems need more than what wild culture has to offer and in order to repair the damage caused by antibiotics, sweet additives and preservatives in foods and a poor diet in general.
By using a starter culture to begin with you can start to repair the damage. Starter cultures help the fermentation phase by limiting cause for contamination, help nourish and grow the right bacteria and yeast needed to build your ecosystem.

So why not just take a tablet?!
Think of over probiotic supplements as a sleeping biotic. They are not LIVE and do not act immediately. They are also manufactured in a laboratory and contain a lot more than a million lactobacillus. Wild and cultured probiotic’s are alive and naturally beneficial. 

So where do you start and what do you look for?!

I don’t endorse any brand, I don’t think any brand is better but what I can say is what to look for in a starter culture.
Look for these ingredients;  Sugar (as a carrier), active lactic bacteria (lactobacillus plantarum, leuconostoc mesenteroides and pediococcus acidilactici) anything else that is listed move right along.
Beware of prepackaged fermented drinks and yoghurt too. Always look at the ingredients. If you see numbers, agave, long words that don’t match the above then don’t use it. You will end up feeding the buggers that are causing all the problems rather than nourishing and repairing.

Above all else speak to a body ecologist if you have inner ecosystem issues. Don’t go it alone either. Find a cultured community and work together, cook together and share your cultures.

I will holding classes locally this month for beginners offering a nurturing approach to lacto-fermentation and how to nourish your body.

 

 

Today We Ate BREAD

No really we did! Sprouted bread thanks to Pete Evans and Pete Melov of B.U Organics in Bondi. We have been enjoying experimenting with Pete Evan’s recipes as it’s a comforting reminder that someone else out there (with the personality power) is as passionate about health as we are in our house.

I am not a big fan of creating a substitute for a food that I can’t have as it makes me want it all the time. Hence why we don’t make breads often. But I had some quinoa (yes I broke the grain brain) and buckwheat in the cupboard and was interested to see what all the fuss was about.

We modified it a bit as Pete suggests to get a different flavour but it is packed with protein, omega 3’s, magnesium, maca and the green well of course Green Superfoods from Micorganics.

Result: My three year old thought her mumma was going banana’s when I told her that she was having Avo and Apple on toast for lunch.

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If you have Pete’s book (which you should as half the country have sold him out almost twice) get it. Available at all book stores nationwide or online at Booktopia.

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Kids creating in the kitchen

A Sweet Treat

What better way to teach your kids about nutrition than to get them in there and get them creating. I have a three year who loves colour and mixing. So once or twice or thrice a week we get in the kitchen and I let her go for it. Today unlike any other day she wanted to make buckini slice, but as a lover of nuts she was determined to get every type in and incorporate her new favourite spread coconut butter.

M’s Coco-ini slice

buckini_slice_M

1/2 cup activated buckwheat groats
1/4 cup of mixed activated nuts
1 big handful of activated macadamia nuts
1/4 cup activated sunflower seeds
1/4 cup activated pepitas
1 Tbsp sesame seeds
1 tsp chia seeds

1/3 cup coconut oil
1-2 Tbsp of Rice Malt Syrup or Maple Syrup (we used a combo as there was not much of either left)
1/3 cup toasted Coconut butter- Melt coconut butter until it is a thick paste (our butter is rock hard in this weather)

First heat the coconut oil on the stove and add sweetener. Take off the heat and whisk until it turns opaque. Set aside to cool slightly.

Using a tea towel, mortar and pestle or jar, smash the nuts (especially the macadamia nuts.

Combine with seeds and buckwheat in a bowl.

Add coconut butter and caramel together and stir through dry ingredients.

Pour into a lined tray and pop in freezer for 30 mins. But seriously taste before you out it in as you’ll want to.

Break into snack size for the kids and yourself and store in the fridge to keep it extra crunchy.

Grain-free Muesli

My daughter is gluten sensitive and it has been hard to change her breakfast routine over the last year. As most babies and toddlers progress in their eating habits they get used to the same thing after a while so to break the toast was hard. Then it was oats.

I have now found the solution in muesli and although the following recipe is time-consuming to begin with, once you do it a few times it’s a quick process. Prep takes a couple of days but the end result lasts a week in out house.

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Grain-free Muesli (makes a 1.5 litre jar)

 

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1/2 Cup Macadamia Nuts
1/2 Cup Cashews/Almonds
1/4 Sunflower Seeds
1/4 Pepitas
2 Tbsp Chia Seeds
1/3 Cup Buckwheat

1/4 Cup sesame seeds
1/4 Cup Coconut Oil
1/2 Cup Goji berries
1 peeled and cored Large or 2 small to medium pink lady or fuji Apples (yes for this I actually did apple, just couldn’t taste test)
1 Tbsp Ground Cinnamon
1 tsp Ginger Powder
1 Tbsp Vanilla Extract
pinch of Himalayan Salt

Soak nuts and seeds in water overnight.
Next morning pre heat oven to 55c (or as low as you can go)
Place goji berries in boiling water to soften
Drain Nuts and seeds and leave to dry on a tea towel (patting to speed up the process)
Place almost dry nuts into food process and blitz to chop nuts (I leave chunky bits, so not into a fine mixture)
Drain Gojis, chop apples and blitz them in food processor along with spices, vanilla and coconut oil.
Combine both mixtures in a bowl and stir.
Line two baking trays and spread mixture evenly.
Bake for about 6-8 hours, checking every couple to toss.

Store in a glass jar.
We serve ours with almond and walnut milk and fresh berries and coconut kefir.

The way I’ve got this to work is I soak everything just before I go to bed, and at breakfast time I get the rest done and have it in the oven so it’s ready to take out by the afternoon.
It makes the house smell amazing while it’s slowly drying and the kids will love it too.

Lasts about a month in a closed jar.